Does my child have autism or SPD?

Can SPD be mistaken for autism?

Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) is commonly misunderstood and tends to be misdiagnosed as either autism or ADHD. And yet the reality is that SPD is believed to affect anywhere between 5% to 15% of school going children.

How can you tell the difference between autism and SPD?

Children with autism have disruptions in brain connectivity along social and emotional pathways, whereas those pathways are intact in children with SPD alone. Children with SPD tend to have more problems with touch than do those with autism, whereas children with autism struggle more with sound processing.

How do I know if my child has SPD?

A child with sensory processing disorder finds it difficult to process and act upon the information received through his senses via sounds, sights, movement, touch, smell, and taste. It may cause difficulty with gross motor skills, creating a clumsy walking gait or frequent tripping.

Can a child have signs of autism but not be autistic?

Those suffering from Asperger syndrome display symptoms that are milder compared to autistic disorder. These patients encounter social challenges along with unusual interests and behavior, but they do not display intellectual disability or difficulties with language. This type is often abbreviated as PDD-NOS.

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What are the 2 core symptoms of autism?

The core symptoms of autism are:

  • social communication challenges and.
  • restricted, repetitive behaviors.

What is sensory autism?

When autistic children are undersensitive to sensory information, it’s called hyposensitivity. These children seek out sensory experiences – for example, they might wear tight-fitting clothing, look for things to touch, hear or taste, or rub their arms and legs against things.

Does SPD cause speech delay?

It is no surprise that children with SPD are often delayed in speech and/or language. If a child is distracted by discomfort caused by their environment, or if they are busy seeking sensations that are not readily available, they are less likely to be able to attend to speech and language learning opportunities.