Quick Answer: Will the cells at the end of telophase I be genetically identical to each other?

Considering the genetic makeup of the homologous pairs, will the cells at the end of telophase I be genetically identical to each other? No, they will not be genetically identical to each other because the homologous pairs separated and the alleles on each homologous pair are not necessarily identical.

What happens to the cells at the end of telophase 1?

The division of cytoplasm usually occurs in telophase I. At the end of telophase I and the process of cytokinesis when the cell divides, each cell will have half the chromosomes of the parent cell. The genetic material does not duplicate again, and the cell moves into meiosis II.

Are the cells at the end of meiosis 1 genetically identical?

At the end of meiosis-I, two daughter cells are formed having half the number of chromosomes present in diploid cell undergoing meiosis. … Each cell has half the number of chromosomes present in the diploid cell. Each cell is identical as far as the number of chromosomes is concerned.

How many identical cells do you have at the end of telophase?

Telophase and Cytokinesis

The nuclear membrane then reforms, and the chromosomes begin to decondense into their interphase conformations. Telophase is followed by cytokinesis, or the division of the cytoplasm into two daughter cells. The daughter cells that result from this process have identical genetic compositions.

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Are the two cells at the end of mitosis genetically identical?

Then in mitosis, the sister chromatids of each chromosome separate, so each daughter cell receives one chromatid from each chromosome. The result of mitosis is two identical daughter cells, genetically identical to the original cell, all having 2N chromosomes.

Do chromosomes Decondense in telophase 1?

Chromosome decondensation (also known as relaxation or decompaction) into expanded chromatin is necessary for the cell’s resumption of interphase processes, and occurs in parallel to nuclear envelope assembly during telophase in many eukaryotes.

Do chromosomes uncoil in telophase 1?

Telophase I is next. Here the spindle fibers are broken up, new nuclear membranes form, the chromosomes uncoil, and the cell divides into two daughter cells. … During this stage the chromosomes condense once again, the nuclear membrane breaks down, and the spindle apparatus forms in each of the two new cells.