What is the correct way to write Down syndrome?

The correct name of this diagnosis is Down syndrome. There is no apostrophe “s” in Down. The “s” in syndrome is not capitalized (syndrome). Encourage people to use people-first language.

What is the politically correct way to say Down syndrome?

People with Down syndrome should always be referred to as people first. Instead of “a Down syndrome child,” it should be “a child with Down syndrome.” Also avoid “Down’s child” and describing the condition as “Down’s,” as in, “He has Down’s.”

Can Down syndrome write?

Misconception: People with Down syndrome can’t read or write. Reality: The majority of children with Down syndrome can learn to read and write.

Is syndrome capitalized?

There is no apostrophe (Down). The “s” in syndrome is not capitalized (syndrome). An individual with Down syndrome is an individual first and foremost. The emphasis should be on the person, not the disability.

Is it OK to say someone has Down syndrome?

Instead of describing someone as “a Down syndrome child,” it should be “a child with Down syndrome.” This is called “person first” language and takes care to put the emphasis on a person, not a disability. Describing the condition as “Down’s”, i.e. “He has Down’s,” or a child as a “Down’s child” should also be avoided.

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How do you call someone with Down syndrome?

People with Down syndrome should always be referred to as people first. Instead of “a Down syndrome child,” it should be “a child with Down syndrome.” Also avoid “Down’s child” and describing the condition as “Down’s,” as in, “He has Down’s.” Down syndrome is a condition or a syndrome, not a disease.

How do Down syndrome students learn to write?

Set up trays or baking sheets with sand or uncooked rice and teach your students how they can use their fingertips to write letters and words in these textured materials. Then, dictate sentences to your students and ask them to write your sentences in the sand trays.

How do you teach Down syndrome to write?

Encourage the child to draw in between the outlines of large printed letters. Trace over or write on top of the letters using a different coloured pencil or crayon. Indicate with a green and red dot on each letter where to start and stop. Teach child to write short, familiar words from their sight vocabulary.

Can 2 Down syndrome parents have a normal child?

Parents with one baby with regular trisomy 21 are usually told that the chance of having another baby with Down’s syndrome is 1 in 100. Very few families are known who have more than one child with Down’s syndrome, so the real chance is probably less than this.

Is Down syndrome a proper noun?

The correct name of this diagnosis is Down syndrome. There is no apostrophe (Down). The “s” in syndrome is not capitalized (syndrome).

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What causes Down syndrome?

About 95 percent of the time, Down syndrome is caused by trisomy 21 — the person has three copies of chromosome 21, instead of the usual two copies, in all cells. This is caused by abnormal cell division during the development of the sperm cell or the egg cell.

What is Down syndrome trisomy 21 name?

Down syndrome, also called Down’s syndrome, trisomy 21, or (formerly) mongolism, congenital disorder caused by the presence in the human genome of extra genetic material from chromosome 21.

Is Downie a slur?

It is commonly used as an insult. Downie has the same meaning as the English “downy”, referring to people with Down’s Syndrome.

Is birth defect politically correct?

AP style: The stylebook says “birth defect” is acceptable in broad references, such as lessening the chances of birth defects. But it should not be used when referring to a specific person or to a group of people with a specific condition. Instead, be specific about the condition and use only if relevant to the story.

How do you say special needs?

Use the term “disability,” and take the following terms out of your vocabulary when talking about or talking to people with disabilities. Don’t use the terms “handicapped,” “differently-abled,” “cripple,” “crippled,” “victim,” “retarded,” “stricken,” “poor,” “unfortunate,” or “special needs.”