Why can multiple alleles result in different phenotypes?

Why can multiple alleles result in many different phenotypes for a trait? This can happen because the more allele options for a specific gene the more possible combinations and therefore possible phenotypes the organism that has that gene could inherit.

How do multiple alleles affect phenotype?

Having more than 1 or 2 alleles for a trait can greatly increase the number of phenotypes, depending on the trait’s specific pattern of inheritance. For example, human blood type is controlled by 3 alleles (just referring to the ABO blood groups here): A, B, and O.

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Why multiple alleles for one gene often result in only two phenotypes?

With multiple alleles, that means there are more than two phenotypes available depending on the dominant or recessive alleles that are available in the trait and the dominance pattern the individual alleles follow when combined together.

How do different alleles produce different phenotypes?

Alleles produce phenotypes (or physical versions of a trait) that are either dominant or recessive. The dominance or recessivity associated with a particular allele is the result of masking, by which a dominant phenotype hides a recessive phenotype.

How can multiple alleles lead to variation?

Multiple alleles combine in different ways in a population, and produce different phenotypes. These phenotypes are caused by the proteins encoded for by the various alleles. Although each gene encodes for the same type of protein, the different alleles can cause high variability in the functioning of these proteins.

How can multiple alleles provide many different phenotypes for a single trait?

Why can multiple alleles result in many different phenotypes for a trait? This can happen because the more allele options for a specific gene the more possible combinations and therefore possible phenotypes the organism that has that gene could inherit.

Why can multiple alleles only be studied in populations?

Why can multiple alleles only be studied in populations? Any individual diploid organism can have, at most, two different alleles at a single locus.

When there are 2 alleles for a gene and both make a protein product the alleles are said to be?

Codominance is a relationship between two versions of a gene. Individuals receive one version of a gene, called an allele, from each parent.

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Is it possible for more than two alleles of a gene to exist?

Although individual humans (and all diploid organisms) can only have two alleles for a given gene, multiple alleles may exist in a population level, and different individuals in the population may have different pairs of these alleles.

When both alleles are expressed equally in the phenotype of the heterozygotes?

Codominance occurs when both alleles are expressed equally in the phenotype of the heterozygote. The red and white flower in the figure has codominant alleles for red petals and white petals. Codominance.

How do alleles differ from each other?

When genes mutate, they can take on multiple forms, with each form differing slightly in the sequence of their base DNA. These gene variants still code for the same trait (i.e. hair color), but they differ in how the trait is expressed (i.e. brown vs blonde hair). Different versions of the same gene are called alleles.

How do alleles of a gene differ from each other mention the significance of alleles?

Alleles of a particular gene differ from each other genetically in their nucleotide sequences. As a result, their products and traits expressed could be different. Significance:Alleles add variability in the population. … Of these three alleles one is recessive and the other two alleles exhibit co-dominance.

Why are dominant phenotypes not always more commonly occurring than recessive phenotypes?

Whether or not a trait is common has to do with how many copies of that gene version (or allele) are in the population. It has little or nothing to do with whether the trait is dominant or recessive.

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What are multiple alleles discuss the phenomenon of multiple Allelism using suitable examples?

An example of multiple alleles is the ABO blood group system in humans. Human gene I (I for ‘isohaemagglutinin’) exists in three allelic forms: IA, IB, and IO. IA and IB produce type A and type B antigens, respectively, on the cell surface of RBCs whereas IO (or i) is a recessive allele and does not produce antigen.

How many different phenotypes are possible?

There are three common alleles in the ABO system. These alleles segregate and assort into six genotypes, as shown in Table 1. As Table 1 indicates, only four phenotypes result from the six possible ABO genotypes.

What is an example of multiple alleles trait What are the alleles that control that trait?

The majority of human genes are thought to have more than two normal versions or alleles. Traits controlled by a single gene with more than two alleles are called multiple allele traits. An example is ABO blood type.

Multiple Allele Traits.

Genotype Phenotype (blood type)
ii O
IAIB AB