Best answer: Which factors not affect the Hardy Weinberg equilibrium?

Which does not affect Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

When a population is in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for a gene, it is not evolving, and allele frequencies will stay the same across generations. There are five basic Hardy-Weinberg assumptions: no mutation, random mating, no gene flow, infinite population size, and no selection.

What are the factors that affect the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The 5 factors are – gene flow, mutation, genetic drift, genetic recombination and natural selection.

Does random mating affect Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The Hardy-Weinberg Law states: In a large, random-mating population that is not affected by the evolutionary processes of mutation, migration, or selection, both the allele frequencies and the genotype frequencies are constant from generation to generation.

Which of the following would not disrupt the allele frequencies in a population that is at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

Which of the following would not disrupt the allele frequencies in a population that is at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. random mating will not disrupt HW eq. In fact, random mating must occur to keep a pop.

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What are the factors that affect allele frequency and how they are affected?

Five factors are known to affect allele frequency in populations i.e., Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. These are gene migration or gene flow, genetic drift, mutation, genetic recombination and natural selection. Gene migration or gene flow – it is movement of alleles into a gene pool or out of a gene pool.

What factors affect allele frequency?

Natural selection, genetic drift, and gene flow are the mechanisms that cause changes in allele frequencies over time. When one or more of these forces are acting in a population, the population violates the Hardy-Weinberg assumptions, and evolution occurs.

What are the factors affecting population genetics?

Population geneticists usually define ‘evolution’ as any change in a population’s genetic composition over time. The four factors that can bring about such a change are: natural selection, mutation, random genetic drift, and migration into or out of the population.

Which of the following would cause deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

Selection, mutation, migration, and genetic drift are the mechanisms that effect changes in allele frequencies, and when one or more of these forces are acting, the population violates Hardy-Weinberg assumptions, and evolution occurs.

Do humans randomly mate?

In humans, at least, for many traits such as blood type, random mating will occur. Individuals do not consciously select a mate according to blood type. But for other traits, such as intelligence or physical stature, this is the case. … As with random mating, some loci may be more affected by these forces.

Which of the following is not an assumption required for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

Which of the following is NOT an assumption required for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium? Explanation: Hardy-Weinberg states that for a population to be in equilibrium, it must not be experiencing migration, genetic drift, mutation, or selection. By this definition, population size cannot fluctuate.

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What are the 5 assumptions of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

The Hardy–Weinberg principle relies on a number of assumptions: (1) random mating (i.e, population structure is absent and matings occur in proportion to genotype frequencies), (2) the absence of natural selection, (3) a very large population size (i.e., genetic drift is negligible), (4) no gene flow or migration, (5) …

What is a possible explanation for why a population may not be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium?

What is a possible explanation for why a population may not be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium? Evolution is occurring on a trait in the population. When we say “populations evolve, not individuals,” what does this mean? Individuals cannot change their genetic makeup, but genotype frequencies in a population can change.