Quick Answer: How do you find the frequency of allele P and Q?

For example, if the frequency of allele A in the population is p and the frequency of allele a in the population is q, then the frequency of genotype AA = p2, the frequency of genotype Aa = 2pq, and the frequency of genotype aa = q2.

How do you calculate p and q allele frequencies?

The Hardy-Weinberg equation used to determine genotype frequencies is: p2 + 2pq + q2 = 1. Where ‘p2‘ represents the frequency of the homozygous dominant genotype (AA), ‘2pq’ the frequency of the heterozygous genotype (Aa) and ‘q2‘ the frequency of the homozygous recessive genotype (aa).

How do you calculate allele frequencies?

An allele frequency is calculated by dividing the number of times the allele of interest is observed in a population by the total number of copies of all the alleles at that particular genetic locus in the population. Allele frequencies can be represented as a decimal, a percentage, or a fraction.

How do you find the frequency of P?

Once we know q, we can simply subtract q from 1 to find the frequency of p. This works only in a simplified scenario, where p and q are the only alleles and account for 100% of the total alleles. In this case, p will be equal to 60% of the alleles, or 0.6.

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What is Q 2 Hardy Weinberg?

In the equation, p2 represents the frequency of the homozygous genotype AA, q2 represents the frequency of the homozygous genotype aa, and 2pq represents the frequency of the heterozygous genotype Aa. In addition, the sum of the allele frequencies for all the alleles at the locus must be 1, so p + q = 1.

What does Q represent in Hardy Weinberg?

The Hardy-Weinberg Equation

q = the frequency of the recessive allele in a population. 2pq = the frequency of the heterozygous dominant genotype. p2 = the frequency of homozygous dominant genotype.

How do you find the frequency of a dominant and recessive allele?

To determine q, which is the frequency of the recessive allele in the population, simply take the square root of q2 which works out to be 0.632 (i.e. 0.632 x 0.632 = 0.4). So, q = 0.63.

  1. The frequency of the recessive allele. …
  2. The frequency of the dominant allele. …
  3. The frequency of heterozygous individuals.

How do you find the equilibrium frequency?

Now solve for p and convince yourself that the equilibrium frequency = p = v/(u+v). Similarly the equilibrium frequency of q = u/(u+v).