Monthly Archives: February 2017

100 Days

It is well known that I suck at crafts. I’m not being harsh on myself. In fact, there is a woman who can testify that I gave her strangest baby blanket (that was thankfully saved by my mother).

The time I tried to make image number 1 and ended up with image number 2. Continue reading

Along comes a milestone

 

We waited a long time for Bridget to speak. It took years of therapy and patience. I remember the first time she said “Abby”, “hooker” and “I love you”. For ages, we were Bridget’s translator to the world around her.  We knew what she was saying, the world around her usually looked at her like she was speaking a foreign language.

Over time, Bridget’s articulation became more pronounced. Suddenly, the girl without words was shouting, “Miss Tisha Look At ME!”.  Continue reading

PACS1 Awareness Day

I love being a member of the PACS1 family. Our small group has grown from 14 families to over 40. Our most recent adoptee asked a reasonable question: “all these young children…I am wondering why it took so long to diagnose X”.  This mother has searched for over 13 years for an answer to what made her son unique.

Why does it take so long? Continue reading

The games we play

All parents wonder when their child will accomplish a goal.  Parents whose child has a disability play a vicious game with themselves. The game is called, “Will my child ever….”

Will my child ever roll over?
Will my child ever stand up?
Will my child ever say my name?
Will my child ever speak?
Will my child ever walk?
Will my child ever say she loves me? Continue reading

Milestone, check.

When Bridget entered the public school system at age 3 we knew her experience would be different from her sisters. Her sister went to a private daycare and then private kindergarten. Bridget needed more. Her sister transitioned to the public school in first grade and eagerly ran onto the school bus. So quickly did she run onto the bus, that we do have a first day on the bus picture.

We knew that Bridget would never take the bus. Continue reading